Character Concept Art from Incarnate: Essence

Four main characters from Incarnate: Essence, my new book coming out on April 18 (Kindle pre-orders available now). See the whole article for enlarged images plus character bios for all four characters. Spoiler alerts for anyone who hasn’t read Incarnate: Existence – the first book in the series – yet.

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Jordan Peterson and God: Truth, Myth, and the Bible

In this post, I am going to write a response/review of Jordan Peteron’s 2017 lecture titled Biblical Series I: Introduction to the Idea of God, which is available to watch on Youtube.

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Success is grim, but failure is not an option

“Incarnate: Essence” Available for Pre-Order

Release date is April 18

***Click here to pre-order yours today!***

 

Following the events in Incarnate: Existence, the handful of desperate freedom fighters known as the forty-eights, led by an immortal being who is reincarnated every time they die, are indelibly transformed by what happened. Beset by violent insurgents, mounting corporate influences, frantic ideological governments, and a group of zealous hackers known as the Anonymous Knights, our protagonist attempts to hold the forty-eights together, even as their own mind seems to be coming apart. Propelled into an unfamiliar future where advanced technology can alter the very genetics of a human being, where the scourge of a new drug called Shift threatens to become an epidemic, and where global conspiracies endeavor to steer the tides of destiny, our protagonist will continue seeking answers to their own puzzling existence as a possible way to ensure a better future for humanity. In this second installment of the five part Incarnate series, old and new allies join our protagonist, no matter what body they come to inhabit. In Incarnate: Essence, success is grim, but failure is not an option.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @AuthorTomHarper

Pre-order on Amazon!

Book 2 “Incarnate: Essence” Due Out in April!

The second installment of my Incarnate series, “Incarnate: Essence” will be available in April. You can still purchase book 1 “Incarnate: Existence” in paperback or ebook on Amazon.

 

Following the events in Incarnate: Existence, the handful of desperate freedom fighters known as the forty-eights, led by an immortal being who is reincarnated every time they die, are indelibly transformed by what happened. Beset by violent insurgents, mounting corporate influences, frantic ideological governments, and a group of zealous hackers known as the Anonymous Knights, Eshe attempts to hold the forty-eights together, even as his own mind seems to be coming apart. Propelled into an unfamiliar future where advanced technology can drastically alter human genetics, where the scourge of a new drug called Shift threatens to become an epidemic, and where global conspiracies endeavor to steer the tides of destiny. In this second installment of the five-part Incarnate series, familiar friends (Akira, the transgender woman with intelligence enhancing brain implants and the daughter she birthed, Masaru, her husband, and Laura, a girl cryonically frozen after dying in the 1990s only to be brought back to life and now is unable to sleep) and mysterious new allies join Eshe as he seeks answers to his own puzzling existence, which may hold the key to ensuring a better future for humanity and himself. In Incarnate: Essence, success is grim, but failure is not an option.

Should LGBTQ+ Characters in Literature Always Make a Cultural Statement?

I am a heterosexual, cisgender, white male. A character in my novel “Incarnate: Existence” is a Japanese transgender woman. For some people this is probably already ‘problematic’ – I, of course, do not and cannot know the experiences of a non-white and transgender person. That could certainly be an article all in itself, whether someone like me should be “allowed” to write this kind of character, and I’ve tangentially written about this idea before. But that’s not what this article is about. I’m interested if, in general, a character in a creative work (book, movie, TV show, etc.) who is LGBTQ+ should always and necessarily be written to make a political or cultural statement, or can the character exist as they are without attempting to make a statement?

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